Gadget

This post inspired by V.J.’s Weekly Challenge #49: Gadget

Tell (or show) me about those gadgets in your life, or better yet, put on your creative caps and invent something new.

 

 

magnifier 1
flashlight magnifier

 

It is right here on my desk.

A gadget of sorts that I tossed in a drawer over 25 years ago.
Thinking…I can probably use this thing once in a while. If I ever need it. Someday. Maybe for teeny tiny print on a label…

Teasing my husband – who is a year my senior – you’ll probably need this before I do. 

Little did I know….

The truth is…I kept it because it was Oma’s. My grandmother, who ended up nearly blind from macular degeneration, viewed life through a blurry haze. Despite the thick glasses she was forced to wear in the last few decades of her life.

When Oma moved to an assisted living facility near me after Opa died, I arranged for her to have cataract surgery – with amazing results. Honey I can see colors!  At 84, the blurry haze was finally in color.

Many years earlier she had gone to the Lighthouse for the Blind in New York for help. Which is where she got this flashlight magnifier. A marvelous invention.

It turned out to be more than a gadget. It was her pathway to reading greeting cards, letters from family and friends. Reader’s Digest. Restaurant menus.

She died at the age of almost 87. I saved her letters. Her photographs. A few pieces of her jewelry. The hand mirror that emits a laughing sound when you pick it up. And the Lighthouse for the Blind flashlight magnifier.

It has been dusted off and put to use a few times over the years. However, the older I get – and the more I have to reach for those DARN reading glasses – the more I switch on Oma’s gadget instead…

So handy when I examine Opa’s color slides…checking for dust…before scanning them for this blog.

It works like a charm.

I think of her every time I use it.

 

 

 

 

 

Delicate

This post inspired by Lens-Artist Challenge #46

The prompt: Delicate

 

I can’t seem to stop taking photos of my Mother’s Day flowers. Hand delivered by my son last weekend. They are the hardiest roses I have ever received.

Perhaps, also, the most delicate. I am drawn to the detail. The subtle coloring. The mysterious greenery that is not baby’s breath.

 

2 roses

 

My eyes constantly drift over to their spot on the table across the room.

A few days later, I am at it again…

roses

I also note how they are aging…gracefully. I refuse to throw any out, even as they lose their perfect delicacy. Their perfect color. Edges growing a bit more discolored every day.

Is beauty only in the new and fresh?…or can we also see beauty here…in the natural  curling at the edges…petals darkening…greenery fading.
As the short life cycle draws to a close.

aging roses

One week later…
Still delicate.
Still beautiful.

 

 

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Feet

This post inspired by Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: The topic is Hands, Feet or Paws

reunion feet

Summer 2005
Family Reunion #10
Four giggling daughters of sisters
Squeezed onto grandma’s bed
6 years old to 23
Dusty dirty feet
Displayed

Years later
many miles
apart…

Those toes now dipped in new waters…
College student
Emergency Physician
Merchandise Manager
PhD candidate

…two doing double duty
as mamas
on their feet
chasing giggling little ones
of their own.

Compassion

This post inspired by V.J.’s Weekly Challenge #48: Compassion

There is no small act of kindness.
Every compassionate act makes large the world.

Mary Anne Radmacher

 

bench

 

One of the most important things you can do on this earth is to let people know they are not alone.

Shannon L. Alder

 

You are not alone…
When we sit together
Side by side.
How are you…
How are you really.

You are not alone…
In turmoil and pain
When you take my hand
I will listen.

You are not alone…
As you heal
Searching for your truth
I am here.

You are heard

Mother’s Day Confessions

And when her biographer says of an Italian woman poet, “during some years her Muse was intermitted,” we do not wonder at the fact when he casually mentions her ten children.

Anna Garlin Spencer

 

flower strip


HAPPY MOTHER’S DAY

especially to all you mean mothers out there…

Adorning a wall in my former home was the following calligraphy print I bought at a local craft fair in the early 1990’s.

It appealed to me with its logic, simplicity and just plain common sense…

mean-mother-.jpeg
Calligraphy by Jean Drolet

 

In 1993 I was inspired to write a story about a day in my life as a mean mother. I dusted it off for this blog post (who knew?…).

~~~

CONFESSIONS OF A MEAN MOTHER
1993

There are two kinds of mothers in this world: Nice Mothers (all the other mothers in town) and Mean Mothers (me). At least that’s what I’m told by my 11 year old daughter; my first born, my pride and joy, my reason for campaigning against Ronald Reagan.

She is right. I am a Mean Mother – married to an equally Mean Father. I have explained that we owe our success to Mean School.  Where else would we learn how to set up “chore charts” directing her to strip and make beds (for starters) and our 5 year old son to set the table and fold socks?  Where else would we learn about bedtimes earlier than all the other kids in town? And how to set an allowance that is less than the mortgage payment?

I often hear about Nice Mothers.

All the Nice Mothers let their kids stay up late and wait on them 24 hours a day. Children lucky enough to have Nice Mothers can also eat candy and chips all day long.  My daughter has many friends who have no chores and watch whatever they want on TV.

“Their mothers let them,” she declares (fathers aren’t usually given credit for this).  This surprises me because I think I’ve seen a few of these mothers at Mean School.

My daughter demands proof about Mean School. My son usually accepts these things at face value; but she, being older and wiser, is suspicious.

The subject came up again one recent evening.

Daughter: “Mom, can I watch TV?”
Me:  “Have you finished your homework?”
Dtr: “I’ll finish it after ‘Rocky and Bullwinkle’ is over”
Me: “Now is better.”  “Remember Mean School Rule #66: ‘Children must finish all homework before viewing TV.'”
Dtr:  “Mom, would you just stop with this stuff about Mean School?” It’s SO ridiculous!”
Me: “Well…don’t you think I am mean? Aren’t I doing a good job?”

“Mommmmm.”  She rolls her eyes. A practically perfect eye roll.
She hates to lose an argument. “There Is No Such Thing As Mean School.” She pauses for effect. “Like, where is it?”

“Only learning-to-be-mean parents know,” I admit.

Hands on hips…”I still don’t believe you!”

I turn to my husband who is sitting on the couch with our son reading The Cat in the Hat. “Don’t you think it should be obvious that we’re going to Mean School? We insist they write Thank You notes for goodness sake! And what about the no-candy-for-snacks rule? Now that’s real proof.”

He looks up at me, right eyebrow raised. “Well, I don’t understand why she doesn’t believe us. Maybe we should take extra classes.”

“That’s IT!”  “We’re not mean enough!”

She stamps her foot. “You guys are just fooling me. I don’t care what you say. There’s no such thing and I know it!”

Our son, eager to end the discussion, defends our position.
“You’re just a butt-head,”  he comments to his sister.

Ignoring him, she crosses her arms and tries again: “And anyway you aren’t that mean…..”

What?
My husband and I look at each other in astonishment.
“All that work!  All those rules! All those lists!”
“And especially all those classes…for nothing?”
“We’ll just have to try harder, that’s all,” he admits.
I nod my head in agreement as our daughter flops down in a chair with a loud sigh and another eye roll.

“Well, kids,” I promise, “Dad and I are going to do the best we can to use what we learn in Mean School no matter what other parents let their kids do. After all, we have our position in the community to think of.  Remember the family motto: if your friend jumps off a bridge, will you do it too?”

Our son laughs. “Yeah, right.”

Our daughter moans. “Oh forget it.”

We, as mean as ever, continue… “Please go pick up your rooms – we can’t see the floor anymore.”

~~~

[I am happy to report we were able to boost enrollment at Mean School by recommending it to several friends. Whose children also grew up to be fine upstanding citizens with great senses of humor]

Monkey Mind

This post inspired by V.J.’s Weekly challenge #47: In-Between

This week, I need your inspiration – where do you go in the in-between? How do you survive it? Or maybe the in-between is ripe with gifts?

~~~

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

We will call you when the all the lab tests come back…
Pathology could take a while…
You’ll have to wait for the results.

       Waiting

Watching
Worrying
Wanting
What If
When Will
What Now
What Then
Why
When
Where

Waiting

The monkey mind churns.
Stealing today’s minutes in-between.
Poof.
Gone.

Helpless jumble of thoughts line up unbidden Bumping into each other Scrambling gibberish Is it five minutes or five hours I can’t stand another secondof….

Turn It Off

Short circuit the loop of lunacy.
Plug in
Three minutes of song.
Shut frantic tired eyes

One-Two.
One-Two-Three-Four.

Volume up.
Way up.

Melodies seep past fear laced neurons
Soothing the gray matter of terror
A foot tapping rhythm takes over…
Three minutes of happy.

ListenHearFeelMoveSingScream
Breathe deep.
Taste hope.

Familiar anthem
From the before.
Temporary respite
Filling the now..
The in-between.

“Ain’t No Mountain High Enough”…
“Lovely Day”…

or a more recent discovery…

“Brighter Than the Sun”…

…whatever reaches deep.

Repeat.

Hold on.

As the clock keeps ticking

Sunup to Sundown

In-between.