Song Lyric Sunday – Burn/Fire/Flame

My contribution to this week’s Song Lyric Sunday

One of my newest favorite singer/songwriter/guitarists – Mary Chapin Carpenter – has actually been making music for 30 years. Born in New Jersey, she spent the early part of her singing career in Washington DC before releasing her first album in 1987. The winner of 5 Grammy awards, she was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2012.

I discovered her a few years ago at a local outdoor concert. I was blown away by her voice and personal catch-ya-off-guard lyrics. I couldn’t take my eyes – or ears – off her and the amazing band she performed with. Playing seamlessly together.

MCC concert
Mary Chapin Carpenter – Prescott Park Arts Festival – 2017 

 

Her most successful album Come On Come On was released in 1992 and went quadruple platinum.

Walking Through Fire is from this album.

 

 

Walking Through Fire

by Mary Chapin Carpenter

When you set a match to your heart, fueling it with bitterness and doubt
That’s the place that once it starts, no amount of tears can put out
I know you’re scared, but no one’s spared when you play with matches

You got me walking through fire
You got me walking through fire

Maybe you’ve been burned by lovers, maybe you’ve been scarred by the pain
But baby, I’m not like the others, drawing moths to a flame
Spite is like a spark, crackling in the dark, consuming all it catches

And you got me walking through fire
You got me walking through fire to get to you
Got me walking through fire (walking through fire)
You got me walking through fire (walking through fire)

You can see the toll it’s taking, you can feel the faith it’s shaking
You can hear the heart it’s breaking now
Baby, I’ve been burned by the fever, I’ve been scorched by desire
But baby, I am not your deceiver or your eloquent liar
Your jealous heart is tearing us apart, turning love to ashes

When you got me walking through fire
You’ve got me walking through fire to get to you
Got me walking through fire
You’ve got me walking through fire

You’ve got me walking through fire (walking through fire)
You’ve got me walking through fire (walking through fire)
As the flames shoot higher
You got me walking through fire (through fire), walking

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge – Cute Factor

This post inspired by Cee’s B&W Photo Challenge. The topic: Cute Factor

Cute Factor! How could I resist this challenge? Absolutely impossible.

 
As soon as my daughter became mobile, she’d crawl…and eventually run…to the front door when she heard her daddy come home from work.
Carrying his guitar. After a long day teaching teenagers how to play notes and chords and…eventually…What Shall We Do With The Drunken Sailor.

She was ever curious about this guitar which was so often in her daddy’s lap. Capturing his attention. As he practiced and made music. While he sang. To himself. To her.

At times – apparently deciding that enough was enough – she’d toddle over to wherever he was strumming. Press her fingers on the strings…silence the music…and demand, as only a tiny child can…No tar daddy!
Daddy would take a short break.

When he left the guitar case propped open next to the living room wall…
our little girl often made use of this just-the-right-size-for-a-toddler seat.

guitarcase call

 

Song Lyric Sunday – Record/Jukebox/DJ/Radio

My contribution to this week’s Song Lyric Sunday (prompt: Record/Jukebox/DJ/Radio).

 

At the age of 17, I discovered Joni Mitchell when I first dropped the needle on her album Blue. Thanks to new friends at my summer job. One of those friends and I were lucky enough to see her in concert together. Three years later. The Music Hall in Boston. High up in the balcony.

Joni Mitchell is a Canadian singer/songwriter. The winner of 9 Grammy awards. Music that ranges from folk to pop to rock to jazz. Lyrics that reach out and grab you tight…especially when you’re 17.

You Turn Me On I’m A Radio was Mitchell’s first Top 40 hit as an artist in America. Lighter and brighter than her more serious musings on Blue, it was released in 1972 on the For the Roses album (her 5th). Written from the point of view of a radio station, it moved more towards the pop genre.

I now get a kick out of the references to dials and transistors…as I remember my first radio. A gift from my grandparents when I was in the 5th grade. A black Sony transistor radio (with a case!). And a dial…which picked up my favorite AM station: 77WABC

I’ll bet Joni Mitchell performed this song that night in Boston…

 

 

 

You Turn Me On I’m a Radio

by Joni Mitchell

If you’re driving into town
With a dark cloud above you
Dial in the number
Who’s bound to love you
Oh honey you turn me on
I’m a radio
I’m a country station
I’m a little bit corny
I’m a wildwood flower
Waving for you
I’m a broadcasting tower
Waving for you
And I’m sending you out
This signal here
I hope you can pick it up
Loud and clear
I know you don’t like weak women
You get bored so quick
And you don’t like strong women
‘Cause they’re hip to your tricks
It’s been dirty for dirty
Down the line
But you know I come when you whistle
When you’re loving and kind
But if you’ve got too many doubts
If there’s no good reception for me
Then tune me out, ’cause honey
Who needs the static
It hurts the head
And you wind up cracking
And the day goes dismal
From “Breakfast Barney”
To the sign-off prayer
What a sorry face you get to wear
I’m going to tell you again now
If you’re still listening there
If you’re driving into town
With a dark cloud above you
Dial in the number
Who’s bound to love you
If you’re lying on the beach
With the transistor going
Kick off the sandflies honey
The love’s still flowing
If your head says forget it
But your heart’s still smoking
Call me at the station
The lines are open

 

 

 

 

Song Lyric Sunday – Minutes/Hours/Days/Weeks/Months

My contribution to this week’s Song Lyric Sunday (prompt: Minutes/Hours/Days/Weeks/Months)

 

At the age of 17, I discovered Carole King – a prolific American singer-songwriter – via her Tapestry album.
She was not, however, a one-hit wonder for me.

I collected her albums over the years, their dust jackets now worn and faded. I devoured each and every one…most likely wearing out the phonograph needle in the process.

Carole King’s 4th album Rhymes & Reasons was released in 1972. It climbed to the No. 2 spot on the Billboard 200 chart.

One of the songs on this album – Gotta Get Through Another Day – still resonates all these years later…although from an entirely different perspective….

 

 

Gotta Get Through Another Day

 

by Carole King

It’s a gray, gray gloomy day
A strange and moody blues day
Gotta get through, gotta get through another day

Corn yellow silk and golden sunlight I remember
As we walked together, you and I
Love like a sweet flaming glow inside
Now has been denied
And I’ve cried till I can’t remember why

I gotta get through, gotta get through some way
Gotta get through, gotta get through another day

Will Tuesday be “good news” day
Or another “paying dues” day
It’s a strange and moody blues day
Anyway

Some say that time brings a better understanding
Of the rhyme and reason to it all
Still the flame keeps burning through the lonely night
It’s just not all right
And I wonder if I’ll make it till you call

I gotta get through, gotta get through some way
It’s a gray, gray gloomy day
A strange and moody blues day
Gotta get through, gotta get through another day
I gotta get through another day.

 

 

 

 

Song Lyric Sunday – School/Books/Learning

My contribution to this week’s Song Lyric Sunday (prompt: School/Books/Learning) will focus on the learning…

Beth Nielsen Chapman, an American singer/songwriter, wrote Life Holds On for her self titled album released in 1990. I discovered her music by chance – often hearing it on the radio. It remains on my list of all time favorite albums!

She plays both guitar and piano throughout this album; keyboards only on Life Holds On.

Many of her songs have been recorded by artists such as Mary Chapin Carpenter, Tanya Tucker, Trisha Yearwood and Martina McBride. She co-wrote This Kiss with Faith Hill, who recorded it as well. Elton John began performed her song Sand and Water in 1997. Her most recent album Hearts of Glass was released in 2018.

 

 

Life Holds On

 

by Beth Nielsen Chapman

I was swinging on the swings when I was a little girl
Trying to get a handle on the big, wide world
When I noticed all the grass in the cracks in the concrete
I said, “Where there’s a will, there’s a way around anything”

Life holds on
Given the slightest chance
For the weak and the strong
Life holds on

There was a third grade boy that we knew in school
He was found face down in a swimming pool
And as they worked on that kid every minute was an hour
And when his eyes fluttered open we could feel that power

Life holds on
Given the slightest chance
For the weak and the strong
Life holds on
Life holds on

Life holds on

Sirens screaming down my street
Fading as they go
Whining somewhere far away
To someone I don’t know
Still, I say a little prayer
There’s always hope
Life holds on.

Through the window in the kitchen I can see outside
My kids taking turns coming down the slide
I try not to worry as they grow a little every day
No, I’ve just got to believe they’re gonna find their way.

Life holds on
Given the slightest chance
For the weak and the strong
Life holds on
Life holds on
Life holds on
Life holds on

 

 

Song Lyric Sunday – Occupation

My contribution to this weeks’s Song Lyric Sunday (prompt: Occupation):

I recently discovered Woman’s Work, a song written and performed by Tracy Chapman…from her third album “Matters of the Heart” released in 1992.

She sang this song at the Farm Aid concert in Texas that same year; the only woman and the only black musician to perform.

Below is a video which serves as a backdrop illustration of this powerful song.
As relevant today – over 20 years later – as it was then.

 

Woman’s Work

by Tracy Chapman

Early in the morning she rises
The woman’s work is never done
And it’s not because she doesn’t try
She’s fighting a battle with no one on her side

She rises up in the morning
And she works ’til way past dusk
The woman better slow down
Or she’s gonna come down hard

Early in the morning she rises
The woman’s work is never done

Song Lyric Sunday – Music Memories

Tonight is the 91st Academy Awards. My ballot is printed. Ready to be filled in.

Full disclosure: I love the Oscars. I write the date on my calendar as soon as it is announced. Back in the days of 3 networks, I was glued to the TV screen for the entire broadcast. I remember watching when “The Sound of Music” won; being also impressed I had managed to stay awake until 12:30 AM!

There may have been a few years I missed it, away at college with no television. Or later, ensconced in early parenthood fatigue and exhaustion. But not many.

My contribution to this week’s Song Lyric Sunday (prompt: Harmony/Melody/Music) honors the 1973 Academy Award winner for Best Song.

“The Way We Were” performed by Barbra Streisand – the ultimate professional of harmony, melody and music. It was the title song from the movie of the same name.

The Way We Were

Lyrics by Alan and Marilyn Bergman
Music by Marvin Hamlisch

Memories light the corners of my mind
Misty water-colored memories of the way we were
Scattered pictures of the smiles we left behind
Smiles we gave to one another for the way we were

Can it be that it was all so simple then
Or has time rewritten every line
If we had the chance to do it all again
Tell me, would we?
Could we?

Memories may be beautiful and yet
What’s too painful to remember
We simply choose to forget
So it’s the laughter we will remember
Whenever we remember
The way we were
The way we were